Livius.Org Anatolia Carthage Egypt Germ. Inf. Greece Judaea Mesopotamia Persia Rome Other

Assyrian Eponym List (1)

Ancient-Warfare.com, the online home of Ancient Warfare magazine
Assyrian Eponym List: list of Assyrian officials (the limmu's, or eponymous magistrates) whose names were given to the years. This list was the foundation of the chronology of ancient Assyria, and still is an important tool to reconstruct the chronology. Two parts remain, one dealing with the reigns of king Naram-Sim to king Šamši-Adad I (first quarter of the second millennium) and one dealing with years 858-699.

On this page, you will find the eldest of these fragments, which was publised as text #8 in Jean-Jacques Glassner's Chroniques Mésopotamiennes (1993; translated as Mesopotamian Chronicles, 2004). There are five copies of this text. The youngest surviving list can be found here.  

(c.1876/1875) From the beginning of the reign of Naram-Sin [...] from the eponomy of [...]
Šu-Sin.
Aššur-malik.
Aššur-imitti.
Ennam-Sin.
(c.1871/1870) In the eponymy of Akutum, [...] took [...] Masiam-ili.
Idi-ahum.
(c.1869/1868) In the eponymy of Samanum, Aminum took Šaduppum.
(c.1868/1867) In the eponymy of Illi-ennam, Sin-abum took the land of Sit.
(c.1867/1866) In the eponymy of Ennam-Anum, [...].
(c.1866/1865) In the eponymy of Ennam-Aššur, Ipiq-Adad entered the house of his father.
(c.1865/1864) In the eponymy of Ennam-Sin, [...].
(c.1864/1863) In the eponymy of Hannanarum, Aminum defeated Ipiq-Adad,
(c.1863/1862) In the eponymy of Dadiya, [...].
(c.1862/1861) In the eponymy of Kapatiya, Ipiq-Adad defeated Aminum.
(c.1861/1860) In the eponymy of Išme-Aššur, Ipiq-Adad took Ziqquratum.
(c.1860/1859) In the eponymy of Aššur-muttabbil, Ipiq-Adad [...].
(c.1859/1858) In the eponymy of  Šu-Nirah, [...].
(c.1858/1857) In the eponymy of Idi-abum, Sin-abum [...].
(c.1857/1856) In the eponymy of Ili-dan, [...].
Aššur-imitti.
Buzaya.
(c.1854/1853) In the eponymy of Inaia, king Šamši-Adad was born.
(c.1853/1852) In the eponymy of [...], a solar eclipse happened; death of Aminum.
[...]-Addu, [...].
Lacuna of about ten years.
(1841/1840) Aššur-malik.
(1840/1839) In the eponymy of Danya, taking of Hupšum.
(1839/1838) In the eponymy of Ennam-Sin, flood in a remote land
Aššur-balati.
Ennam-Aššur.
Itur-Aššur.
(1835/1834) In the eponymy of Šu-bêli, Ila-kabkabu took Suprum.
(1834/1833) In the eponymy of Šarrum-Adad, the man of Elam defeated Ipiq-Adad, and king Šamši-Adad entered the house of his father.
Šu-Laban.
(1832/1831) In the eponymy of Aššur-imitti, the Lullu defeated the king in Lazapatum.
(1831/1830) In the eponymy of Dadaya, Mut-abbih [...].
(1830/1829) In the eponymy of Dadaya, ditto, Ipiq-Adad took Arrapha.
(1829/1828) In the eponymy of Ahi-šalim, the taking of Gasur.
Usur-ša-Ištar,
(1827/1826) In the eponymy of Kataya, [...].
(1826/1825) In the eponymy of Šu-Sin, [...].
(1825/1824) In the eponymy of Abu-šalim, the taking of Sin-abušu of Nerebtum.
(1824/1823) In the eponymy of Šu-Daya, [...].
(1823/1822) In the eponymy of Šu-Dadim, the taking of Ne[...].
(1822/1821) In the eponymy of Aššur-tukulti, Šamši-Adad defeated the man of Unnini, and Mut-Ia[...] defeated.
(1821/1820) In the eponymy of Puzur-Ištar, Šamši-Adad [...].
(1820/1819) In the eponymy of Atanah, Ipiq-Adad defeated [...] and took the land of [...].
(1819/1818) In the eponymy of Erišum, Šamši-Adad defeated [...] in Dur-[...].
Aššur-ennam-šalim.
(1817/1816) In the eponymy of Inib-Ištar, Ipiq-Adad died.
Aššur-Bêl-malki.
(1815/1814) In the eponymy of Be[...], Kirbana [...].
(1814/1813) In the eponymy of [...], Šamši-Adad [...].
(1813/1812) In the eponymy of [...], Šamši-Adad [...].
(1812/1811) In the eponymy of Šu-ilišu, Šamši-Adad [...].
(1811/1810) In the eponymy of Ibni-Adad, Šamši-Adad [returned from Karduniaš].[1]
Lacuna of two years.
(1808/1807) In the eponymy of Atamar-Ištar, [Šamši-Adad captured Aššur].
Lacuna of eight years.
(1799/1798) In the eponymy of [...].
(1798/1797) In the eponymy of Idna-Aššur, Šamši-Adad [...].
(1797/1796) In the eponymy of Atanum, Šamši-Adad defeated twelve kings; Iahdun-Lim, king of Mari, [...] these kings returned [...].
(1796/1795) In the eponymy of Aššur-taklaku, Šamši-Adad defeated [...].
(1795/1794) In the eponymy of [...].
(1794/1793) In the eponymy of Haya-malik, [Šamši-Adad captured Mari].
(1793/1792) In the eponymy of Šalim-Aššur, [...].
(1792/1791) In the eponymy of Šalim-Aššur, [...].
(1791/1790) In the eponymy of Ennam-Aššur, Šamši-Adad took the land of [...].
(1790/1789) In the eponymy of Sin-muballit, Šamši-Adad took the land of [...].
(1789/1788) In the eponymy of Riš-Šamaš, Išme-Dagan defeated [...].
(1788/1787) In the eponymy of Ibni-Adad, Šamši-Adad took the land of [...].
(1787/1786) In the eponymy of Aššur-imitti, Šamši-Adad defeated [...] and took it. Daduša took the land of [...], the land of Me-Turan, the land of [...].
(1786/1785) In the eponymy of Ili-ellati, [...].
(1785/1784) In the eponymy of Rigmanum, Muna[...].
(1784/1783) In the eponymy of Ikun-piya, Muna[...] defeated [...] and Šamši-Adad [...] Me-Turan [...] for Dadusa [...].
(1783/1782) In the eponymy of Asqudum, Šamši-Adad took Qabra.
(1782/1781) In the eponymy of Aššur-malik, Išme-Dagan defeated Ahazum and Šamši-Adad captured Nurrugum and captured these nine kings: Kibrum, king of [...; ..., king of ...; ..., king of ...]; Yašub-Adad, king of Ahazum; [..., king of ...; ..., king of ...]; Yašub-Lim, king of [...; ..., king of ..., ..., king of ...]; he gave them as booty to Daduša.
(1781/1780) In the eponymy of Ahiyaya, the Turukkeans opened hostilities. Šamši-Adad and Išme-Dagan defeated the Turukkeans and the [...] in Burullan; Yasmah-Adad defeated the Yaminites and unified the banks of the Euphrates.
In the eponymy of Ahiyaya, Mutu-Bisir [...] defeated [...] at the gate of Saggaratum.
(Colophon) Total [...] years, until the victory of the gate of Saggaratum.
Hand of Habdu-malik. Limi-Dagan the nen who dictated.

Note 1:
The restoration of this line is based on the Assyrian King List, in which Šamši-Adad's accession is briefly described (more...).
© Jona Lendering for
Livius.Org, 2006
Revision: 3 Oct. 2006
Livius.Org Anatolia Carthage Egypt Germ. Inf. Greece Judaea Mesopotamia Persia Rome Other