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Philippi, Archaeological Museum

I had been in Philippi before, but until today, I had not heard of a museum. Not surprising: it has been closed for about eight years, and when it was built, a new basilica was discovered. (If I’ve counted correctly, that’s the fifth church in the city where Saint Paul lived for some time.) The museum was reopened only recently, and some explanatory signs are still missing.

The collection is not very large, but there are some splendid pieces, like the relief of a dancing maenad from the theater, a superb Tyche, a number of inscriptions, a bust of Antoninus Pius, a gold wreath and several other objects from a tomb, a skeleton, and so on. On the upper floor is a collection of Christian art.

I also liked the building itself: very light, without unnecessary ornaments – functional. I was reminded of New Objectivity, which is the only architectural style I really like.

In the garden of the museum, from which you have a good view of the battlefield, are many inscriptions, including several that are not included in the digital database of Clauss/Slaby.

This museum was visited in 2010.

This page was last modified on 27 March 2014.