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Trier: Bridge


The Roman bridge at Trier. Photo Richard Kroes.
The Roman bridge at Trier.
Augusta Treverorum: Roman city, modern Trier.
   
History Pictures

Trier rose to prominence when the Roman general Agrippa built the road from Lyon to Cologne, and a bridge had to be constructed near the place where the Saar empties itself in the Moselle. There is a dendrochonological date of 17 BCE for one of the pieces of wood of the bridge. The monument was rebuilt several rchronological dates 71, 144, and 

It is still in use, as this satellite photo shows. A couple of things have changed, however. Today, the bridge has six arches, but we know that there must have been at least one arch more in the west, and three in the east, bringing the grand total up to ten. The superstructure, now made of stone, was once made of wood. The second photo shows, immediately below the modern arch of brick, a ledge; a similar row of these stones can be seen on the photo to the left. This was the support of the wooden arch.

Edge of Empire. The book Arjen Bosman and I wrote about Rome's Lower Rhine Frontier.
Edge of Empire. The book Arjen Bosman and I wrote about Rome's Lower Rhine Frontier (order; review)
Piers of the bridge at Trier. Photo Richard Kroes. One of the piers of the bridge at Trier. Photo Richard Kroes. Pile of the bridge at Trier. Landesmuseum, Trier (Germany). Photo Marco Prins. One of the piers of the bridge at Trier. Photo Richard Kroes. The Roman bridge at Trier. Photo Richard Kroes.
Two arches. One of the piers. Pile of the bridge at Trier. Landesmuseum. One of the piers. General view, from the Baths of Barbara.

History Pictures
Jona Lendering for
Livius.Org, 2008
Revision: 9 Dec. 2008
Livius.Org Anatolia Carthage Egypt Germ. Inf. Greece Judaea Mesopotamia Persia Rome Other