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Livius

The Livius.org website offers articles on ancient history. We are currently improving the site, which has more than 3650 pages. At the moment, there are 614 articles in the new style. You can search to find what you are looking for or browse through the articles using categories or tags. The pages that were most recently converted to the new style, are listed below.

Herodian

Herodian (c.170-c.240): Greek historian, author of a History of the Roman Empire. The full text can be found here.

This page was created on 30 July 2014.

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Legion: alphabetically

A Roman legion was an infantry unit consisting of  heavily armed soldiers, equiped with shields, armor, helmets, spears and swords. In the early republic, the strength of a legion was about 3,000 men; there were 4,800 legionaries in the days of Julius Caesar; the twenty-five legions that defended the empire during the reign of Augustus counted more than 5,000 soldiers. They were the backbone of the Roman army, supported by auxiliary troops. Although in the third century, large cavalry units gradually superseded the legions as Rome's most important force, many of them are attested in the fourth and early fifth centuries.

Below, you will find an alphabetical catalogue of the imperial legions. A chronological list is here.

This page was created on 30 July 2014.

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Legion: chronological

A Roman legion was an infantry unit consisting of  heavily armed soldiers, equiped with shields, armor, helmets, spears and swords. In the early republic, the strength of a legion was about 3,000 men; there were 4,800 legionaries in the days of Julius Caesar; the twenty-five legions that defended the empire during the reign of Augustus counted more than 5,000 soldiers. They were the backbone of the Roman army, supported by auxiliary troops. Although in the third century, large cavalry units gradually superseded the legions as Rome's most important force, many of them are attested in the fourth and early fifth centuries.

Below, you will find a chronological catalogue of the imperial legions. An alphabetical list is here.

This page was created on 30 July 2014.

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III Parthica

Legio III Parthica: one of the Roman legions. Its name indicates that it was recruited to fight against the Parthians.

This page was created on 29 July 2014.

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Mathišta

Mathišta ("the greatest"): probably the title of the man who had appointed as the successor of the king in the Persian empire.

This page was created on 27 July 2014.

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Syennesis

Syennesis: title of the native king of Cilicia, whose palace was at Tarsus. The Luwian word suuannassai means "belonging to the dog", a title that is well attested although its meaning remains unclear. Three leaders with this name are known.

This page was created on 27 July 2014.

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