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House of the Planetarium

Italica: Roman colony in western Andalusia, not far from Seville. Several second-century houses have been excavated.

Planetarium mosaic
Planetarium mosaic
The site of Italica has for a substantial part been excavated. The mansions of the Hadrianic quarter, however, are the main delight of a visit to Italica.

One of these is the House of the Planetarium Mosaic, which is remarkable. Not because it is unique. On similar mosaics, the Sun - as the universe's largest source of light - is in the center, surrounded by the moon and the five planets, which receive their light from the sun. Here, the main celestial body is in the circle of six, and Venus is in the center: it is loves that moves the universe.

Planetarium mosaic, Jupiter
Planetarium mosaic, Jupiter
On the photo top right, the sun is top right. You can recognize his rays. Anti-clockwise, we see the Moon (top), Mars (with a helmet), Mercury (with wings on his hat), Jupiter (bottom; photo below), and a slightly damaged Saturn.

It is common to call this a planetarium, but it might, of course, also be interpreted as a calendar with the seven days of the week.