Zosimus, New History 1.28

Zosimus (Greek Ζώσιμος): Early Byzantine, pagan author of a history of the Roman Empire, published in the first quarter of the sixth century CE.

The translation of ZosimusNew History offered here was printed in 1814 by W. Green and T. Chaplin in London, and was probably prepared by J. Davis of the Military Chronicle and Military Classics Office. The translator is anonymous. The text was found at Tertullian.org. The notes were added by Jona Lendering.


[1.28.1] Meantime the Scythians of Europe were in perfect security and went over into Asia, spoiling all the country as far as Cappodocia, Pessinus, and Ephesus, until Aemilian, commander of the Pannonian legions, endeavoring as much as possible to encourage his troops, whom the prosperity of the barbarians had so disheartened that they durst not face them, and reminding them of the renown of Roman courage, surprised the barbarians that were in that neighborhood. 

[1.28.2] Having destroyed great numbers of them, and led his forces into their country, removing every obstruction to his progress, and at length freeing the subjects of the Roman Empire from their ferocity, he was appointed emperor by his army. On this he collected all the forces of that country, who were become more bold since his successes against the barbarians, and directed his march towards Italy, with the design of fighting Gallus, who was as yet. unprepared to contend with him. 

[1.28.3] For Gallus had never heard of what had occurred in the east, and therefore made only what accidental preparations were in his reach, while Valerian went to bring the Celtic and German legions. But Aemilian advanced with great speed into Italy, and the armies were very near to each other, when the soldiers of Gallus, reflecting that his force was much inferior to the enemy both in number and strength, and likewise that he was a negligent indolent man, put him and his son to death, and going over to the party of Aemilian, appeared to establish his authority.